MOLECULES OF EMOTION BOOK

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Molecules of Emotion: The Science Behind Mind-Body Medicine and millions of other books are available for instant access. Molecules Of Emotion: The Science Behind Mind-Body Medicine Paperback – February 17, In her groundbreaking book Molecules of Emotion, Candace Pert. Start by marking “Molecules of Emotion: The Science Behind Mind-Body Medicine” as Want to Read: How do our thoughts and emotions affect our health? Dr. Pert describes the book as a description of her research that discovered the scientific link that proves that emotions are. Compre Molecules of Emotion: The Science Behind Mind-Body Medicine ( English Edition) de Candace B. Pert na llowponquoresmai.gq Confira também os eBooks.


Molecules Of Emotion Book

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Molecules of Emotion by Candace B. Pert - Why do we feel the way we feel? How do our thoughts and emotions affect our health? Are our bodies and minds. In her groundbreaking book Molecules of Emotion, Candace Pert -- a neuroscientist whose extraordinary career began with her discovery of the opiate. Molecules Of Emotion by Candace Pert, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.

And so it goes, slowly but surely Dr. Perts apparent personality flaws seem to catch up to her, and she goes to science jail i. She's suddenly an outsider, misunderstood righteous victim who's down with the Depak Chopra, and from there its a full on crystal catastrophe, replete with Christian conversion and dream healing experiences.

Ewe it stinks like a men's room at a Dairy farm all the sudden!

Review of ‘Molecules of Emotion’

Pure gas! I'm as ashamed as if it were I who dealt it. I'm fully aware that I like what the other reviewers hated about the book, and disliked what other reviews seem to be after, i.

Perts later career. Side rant: Saying mind body is like saying vista view, what a lovely view of the vista. Calling the mind "non-physical" is not even wrong. That's how lame the idea is.

Molecules of Emotion: The Science Behind Mind-Body Medicine

For that matter, calling anything "non-physical" is not even wrong. Before you write me off as a total dick skeptic, no wait a minute, I kind of am a total dick skeptic so go ahead and write me off. But if you're still reading this, I want to say that I'm not your average total dick skeptic.

I teach psychology at a Buddhist University, I practice a mindfulness based psychotherapy modality as a mental health clinician, I have been meditating seriously for over 30 years. I have been doing Yoga for almost as long. I lived in India for a bit, meditated in a cave, the whole nine. But I also love science and I am a total neuroscience dork.

All I can say is, there is really interesting hard science exploring mindfulness and wellbeing. Don't waste your time with this shit if you're really interested in this subject. View all 7 comments. The title of this book is misleading. This book is not about the molecules of emotion or explaining why you feel the way you feel.

Molecules of Emotion

It is the outlet for author, scientist, and conference speaker Candace Pert chose to share her personal and professional history, toot her own horn so to speak, and educate the average person on the new paradigm in scientific research that promotes a holistic approach concerning mind, body, and soul.

The way Pert makes it sound, she is spearheading the new paradigm m The title of this book is misleading. The way Pert makes it sound, she is spearheading the new paradigm movement by being the token scientist to lend her extensive research expertise. I just couldn't stop asking myself, "But what about the molecules of emotion?

When is she going to talk about feelings? She also used the book as a platform to discuss the male chauvinism, intense competition, the failure of science to recognize new discoveries, and the bureaucracy of an system that should be helping people live healthier happy lives instead of bolstering up the egos of men in power. Even though I felt grossly mislead by the title, I couldn't help but get caught up in the author's narrative. Her many years of science writing the boring passive voice did not negatively impact this playful yet straight forward narrative that was easy to understand by someone who is not on the science field.

She broke down her research and provided easy to understand examples without talking down to the reader. This is key for any science book targeted for a general mainstream audience. If you are interested in learning of one particular scientist's journey through science between the 's and the 's whose research spanned cancer and HIV, then this is the book for you.

It won't disappoint. If you are interested in the science behind either of these diseases, then this is the book for you. If you want to be beat over the head with holistic adages like eating organic food and not doing drugs or drinking alcohol, the last chapter is definitely for you.

This is where the book became annoying and lost some of its credibility with me. It could also stem from the fact that the book was written well over a decade ago and her earth-shattering advice is common knowledge for almost all Americans at this point. Overall, I could only give this book two stars. I would have given it three or four if it actually focused on emotions. View all 3 comments. Nov 06, Franz rated it it was amazing. Excellent account of the politics and egos and one-upmanship involved in big science, in this case molecular biology.

Author is a scientist deeply involved in the discovery of the peptides that influence emotions a couple decades ago.

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She tells the story of the hard work and good luck necessary to find these elusive molecules, the challenge of being a woman in a field dominated by alpha males, and her own personal journey from a hard core materialist to exploring the connections between the mind Excellent account of the politics and egos and one-upmanship involved in big science, in this case molecular biology.

She tells the story of the hard work and good luck necessary to find these elusive molecules, the challenge of being a woman in a field dominated by alpha males, and her own personal journey from a hard core materialist to exploring the connections between the mind and the body. Well written for us lay people. Nov 12, Rivka Levy rated it it was amazing Shelves: This was the first book that helped me to start connect the dots, energy-medicine wise, that the body is just a 'mirror' for the soul.

Pert's assertion that the body is actual the subconscious mind made flesh completely blew me away. She also lived a very interesting life, and wrote this book with a lot of passion and occasional melancholy making it the first scientific page-turner I ever came across. Brilliant book, and highly recommended for people who want an introduction to a more holistic w This was the first book that helped me to start connect the dots, energy-medicine wise, that the body is just a 'mirror' for the soul.

Brilliant book, and highly recommended for people who want an introduction to a more holistic way of viewing their health and happiness, with a scientific stamp of approval from a bona fide PhD. Jul 27, Zeke rated it liked it. This is a really interesting story of the struggle that women go through in the scientific community. But really, you're not a superhero. And your writing is imprecise. And you contradict yourself. I read the whole thing, but was really frustrated along the way.

Candace Pert, a neuroscientist and discoveror of the opiate receptor, recounts both the intricate relationship between mind, body, and emotions, and her own career uncovering those connections and the neurochemical basis of them.

Beginning her career in the early s, gender was an even bigger obstacle than it is now, which no cultural or legal expectation that it shouldn't be. Sometimes she had to fight for recognition of her contributions; other times she had to fight to be able to do the wo Candace Pert, a neuroscientist and discoveror of the opiate receptor, recounts both the intricate relationship between mind, body, and emotions, and her own career uncovering those connections and the neurochemical basis of them.

Sometimes she had to fight for recognition of her contributions; other times she had to fight to be able to do the work at all. But along the way, she made major discoveries, and had life-changing experiences. The mind-body dichotomy was still unquestioned scientific orthodoxy in her early days. She doesn't say, but I will: Rene Descartes has a lot to answer for. Pert's work with neuropeptides and their receptors helps to rebuild the essential unity of the person, mind, body, and emotions, and uncover the connections between our emotional health and our physical health.

There are times when this goes right up to edge of woo-woo, but it doesn't cross over. Pert is spiritual, religious, and very much a scientist. No, that's not a contradiction or a paradox. She's quite open about her beliefs, and the interrelations among the different aspects.

Her central, guiding principle is a commitment to truth. It's a fascinating story. There are times when I find it quite frustrating. It is, however, well worth reading if you are interested in the topic. I bought this audiobook. I decided to review this book as I go through it so my impressions are fresh. Because as I began I found myself over-analyzing my own response to the writing. So be warned, this will be the longest Goodreads review I have ever done by the time I am through with it. The author began by introducing herself and all her credentials.

It crossed over the line from autobiography to bragging, making me question why she needed to spend so many pages telling me of her brilliance. Makes me a bit skepti I decided to review this book as I go through it so my impressions are fresh.

Makes me a bit skeptical Her struggles to overcome the "good old boy" mentality and the competitive atmosphere in the scientific community of the 's has had me riveted. I must go read more! I never really thought before about how the body communicates on a cellular level, nor about how our emotions filter our sensory and memory processing. I usually do not take so long to finish a nonfiction work of this length! Sometimes the writing was compelling enough to keep me immersed in the pages, such as the fast-paced accounts of espionage-like laboratory drama.

However, most portions were too easy for me to set aside. The text shifts abruptly between present and past tenses while jumping back and forth from scientific minutiae to lecture hall monologue to panel discussion dialogues. Other portions come across as a memoir-oriented autobiography of the author's achievements and struggles within the highly politicized scientific community.

While I agree with the author's premise that the body and mind are more inseparable in function than most of mainstream medicine acknowledges, I found some of her ideas a little too far "out there" for my taste.

Two quotations from the book stood out to me: Brian Luke Seaward "The body becomes the battlefield for the war games of the mind. All the unresolved thoughts and emotions, the negativity we hold on to, shows up in the body and makes us sick.

View 1 comment. Apr 14, Amity rated it it was amazing Shelves: I really enjoyed this book because Candace Pert is a scientist who has developed the skill of sharing her discoveries and scientific pursuits with diverse audiences.

This is the first time I have read s I really enjoyed this book because Candace Pert is a scientist who has developed the skill of sharing her discoveries and scientific pursuits with diverse audiences. This is the first time I have read solid scientific research regarding the way our minds, spirits and bodies work together. I especially like her discussion of self-honesty p. I also resonated with her discussion of focusing our intent and working through inner conflicts to increase our success and enjoyment of life.

Jun 01, Nancy rated it it was amazing Shelves: Not only was this a friendly read, but I learned a lot about the Scientific community, the politics or the system, and how it works.

When people ask me about this book, I find it hard to categorize. It's a little bit memoir, a little bit science and understanding of the human body, and a little bit personal philosophy on healing. Overall, it was both educational and uplifting and recommended to anyone who wants to explore more the connection between physiology and the mind. May 03, Mayda Ochoa added it.

Editorial Reviews

Molecules of emotions A book written by a scientist, which is was also a woman, and a superb human being, who walked a long road to be able to explain scientifically why she was the way she was, and how our emotions could predestine and predict our health and even our death.

She had to fight for her knowledge in a world of men who took from her even her most precious scientific awards. This is a book, which will open your eyes to how our bodies and minds are parts of a higher existence.

Jun 03, Rebecca Bruce rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: I loved this book! What an eye-opening experience!

Candace Pert, PhD discovered the opiate receptor back in the 70's. Her discovery led to the making of SSRI drugs and all kinds of mood-altering substances that she warms against.

Her book describes how your body is your subconscious mind, your health is a product of how you think about yourself. Taking many of the drugs on the market today alter the bodies chemistry, but that in a way that can be sustained. The Innovative Spirit. Morse Code Celebrates Years and Counting. Library of Congress Celebrates Whitman's th. Travel American South. Travel With Us. The Sublime Sensation of the Swimming Hole. At the Smithsonian Visit. New Research. Curators' Corner.

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Mah Jong Quest. Magazine Current Issue. Give a Gift. Subscribe Top Menu Current Issue. Like this article? Previous Article A Mailbox with a Catch. The Karez is a modern-day engineering marvel and a prime example of people working with, not against, the forces of nature to deliver their needs—in this case, water. Comment on this Story. First Name. Last Name. This is because Pert, the author, mixes the explanation of her research and discoveries with an autobiographical account of how the discoveries were made and how she had to fight against the male-dominated scientific community to be recognised for her own achievements.

In sort, the book is neuroscience meets John Le Carre-style thriller.

Pert's story began when, following a riding accident, she was given morphine. While recovering, she marvelled at how, apart from relieving the pain, each injection of morphine filled her with a sense of euphoria and well-being.

It was this experience that sparked her interest in the connection between the mind and body. The thought was that for the morphine to work there had to be "receptors" in the brain capable of receiving and interpreting the chemical message contained within the morphine. And, if such receptors existed, it followed that the human body must already produce that same chemical message itself - otherwise a receptor for the message wouldn't exist in the first place and the morphine would not have any effect.It was a fascinating read.

Before you write me off as a total dick skeptic, no wait a minute, I kind of am a total dick skeptic so go ahead and write me off. As the material objects of domestic life -- the dishes, the clothes, the iron I'd used to iron Agu's white shirts -- began to disappear into boxes, I became aware of a growing sense of panic.

I get a thrill out of sitting in the empty room, when all is quiet and there exists a state of pure potentiality in which anything can happen. Caroline Myss, Ph.